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. >>> plus, how washington state is stirring the pot. >>> sex education with tony award-winning playwright, eve insler >>> beware, our fiscal policy is under attack from amoral cybords. >>> good morning, my fellow americans. i'm melissa harris perry coming to you from the msnbc studios at rockefeller center in new york city. i interrupt our program to bring you the following news. cyboergs are among us. new recording that is uncovered the extent to which these artificial entities have taken over our country. right before our eyes, they have been taking over all of our nation's institutions, slowly extending their control over our political, legal, and economic systems with their insatiable appetite for profits and prophets alone. these amoral immortals are decimating the rights of us. they are not criminals but they can live forever. even when they take a death blow, a quick cash infusion can keep them going. you may not notice them yet. soon, they will amass every single asset capable of generating hefty returns. these undead are recreating our civic and political culture in service of po
a whole heck of a lot of noise. let's get straight to washington. nbc's kristen welker at the white house and luke russert is tracking developments at capitol hill and nbc news senior political editor mark murray is here to break it down for us from the washington bureau. we will start with kristen. last we heard, kristen welker, the president came out to report that he is modestly optimistic. has the rhetoric changed at all today? >> reporter: it has changed a little bit. the president is still modestly optimistic, but i just spoke with a democratic source who tells me at this hour a deal is looking doubtful. of course, we want to underscore the fact that these negotiations are very fluid so that characterization could change at any moment, but it seems as though the discussions going on behind the scenes right now have yet to bear fruit and right now we do have the focus on the senate. majority leader reid and mitch mcconnell trying to hammer out a deal that would, to some extent extend the bush-era tax cuts for those making $250,000 although we might see that number go up to 400,000, 5
to our economy. not right now. >> coming up, who do americans blame for the stalemate in washington? good afternoon to you. i'm craig melvin. you are watching msnbc, the place for politics. this hour we are going look at the big picture. what's happening on capitol hill right now and how congressional leaders are working with the white house. plus, what it all means for your paycheck as higher payroll taxes are only days away unless congress acts. one step forward, two steps back. president obama and republican lawmakers have been dancing that waltz for six weeks now, but the music stops when the countdown clock at the bottom of your screen runs out. so where do fiscal cliff talks stand at this critical hour? nbc's kristen welker is on the north lawn and luke russert are both following developments this saturday afternoon. kristen, i'll start with you. any indication at this particular point as to what's happening behind closed doors this afternoon? >> reporter: well, i think most of the action is going on in the hill where staffers with majority leader reid and minority leader mcconnell
. that is the suspense, will the contestant take the deal or will she go all of the way! well, washington, will you? will you go all of the way? we are living in an era where politics is about like a game show, and high stakes for big rewards all while playing with borrowed cash. on friday, when the show returned to the regularly scheduled broadcast of high-stakes fiscal cliff hanging, we watched breathlessly with fingers crossed as the congressional leaders met at the white house. just before 6:00 p.m., the president came to the podium to give the latest on where we are, deal or no deal. >> i'm modestly optimistic that a deal can be achieved. >> deal or no deal? definitely or maybe. what the president may need for a win is a scene change. >> senators reid and mcconnell are discussing a potential agreement to where we can get a bipartisan bill out of the senate over to the house and done in a timely fashion so that we met the december 31st deadline. but, given how things have been working this this town, we always have to wait and see until it actually happens. >> so there you have it. there will b
enforcement act that, if passed, would take away the ability from washington, d.c. to determine its own gun laws. perhaps it should be no surprise you, the card carrying member of the nra who rode to victory with tea party backing, made your position clear when you first ran for congress, saying quote, i stand strongly in support of our second amendment rights. the constitution grants south carolinans the right to defend themselves and their families and i will continue fighting to make sure that right is not weakened in any way. really, congressman, all of this when of the 142 guns used by the perpetrators of the 62 mass murders since 1982 in this country, three-quarters of those guns were obtained legally. all of this when in 2008 and 2009, gun deaths were the leading cause of death among black teens. let's be clear. even though you stand to be the only african-american senator in 2013, this is not about race. you said when you chose not to join the congressional black caucus that your campaign was never about race, and that's fine. you will be the senator representing the great state of
for us. >> reporter: thank you. >> joining us now from washington, d.c., is connecticut congressman john larson issuing a statement asking colleagues to pass tougher gun control laws. to do nothing is to be complicit in those assaults. good morning congressman. >> good morning. >> let me offer my condolences in the tragedy in your state. yesterday, all we knew was the name of the murder. now we know the names of the victims. i'm happy to shift our focus to them, but it's so hard to hear their names, to hear how they died. is it now, finally the moment when congress and the president will act on gun control? >> you certainly have to hope so. i know in talking to friends and family as you just reported, the more you hear these details, the more horrific it gets. the innocence of these kids and to see the pictures and there's just -- we are broken hearted in connecticut. there's a point where you have to say enough. this is -- listen, i said in that release, i'm not sure that all the measures that we would hope to enact would ever be able to prevent an incident like this. i know, certainly,
. it's not going to come out of washington. we ought to pray for our politicians and the thought leaders. we are out here to sell chicken. >> just trying to sell some chicken while using millions of those proceeds to support organization that is are anti-same-sex marriage. when the public outcry got loud, it was mike huckabee to the rescue declaring august 1 to be chick-fil-a day. church folk raised their fist full of chicken for support. sometimes chicken isn't just chicken. dorey clark is joining us. i have to say, there is something wonderful that it felt like homophobia became the thing. >> it's true. in the case of chick-fil-a, they are bitter that all the lesbians are bitter. >> wow. that's why lesbians like me so much. i'm a vegan. >> the story wasn't so much about everyone is still eating there. it's about the boycott. i was a part of it. it was horrid. i travel. chick-fil-a was a thing for me. for me, i like chick-fil-a, i love chick-fil-a. it was easy when people you don't like their stuff like papa johns, i don't care, i'm from new york, i know what pizza tastes like.
states didn't allow early voting at all. only eight states in washington, d.c., allowed for same-day voter registration. then there was confusion at the ballot box. 19 polling places in hawaii ran out of paper ballots. at least five other states saw voting precincts run out. we can't know how many turned up to vote, we know 93 million eligible americans did not vote in the 2012 presidential election. according to a new survey from public affairs, more than 25% of them did not vote because they were not registered. as president obama said on election night, we have to fix that. when we come back, we'll tell you how we can. new prilosec otc wildberry is the same frequent heartburn treatment as prilosec otc. now with a fancy coating that gives you a burst of wildberry flavor. now why make a flavored heartburn pill? because this is america. and we don't just make things you want, we make things you didn't even know you wanted. like a spoon fork. spray cheese. and jeans made out of sweatpants. so grab yourself some new prilosec otc wildberry. [ male announcer ] one pill each morning.
. they need 218 votes in the house. part of the art of washington politics is giving your opponents something to run against you in the next election. >> what they have to give house republicans is something they can take back to these very conservative jerry man der districts. it is not as if most people are running in swing districts. most are running in hard right districts where they can get a primary challenge. the reason you are hearing boehner ask what are you going to cut? they want the president to put some ideas on the table. all of the bad ideas, they are all coming from the republican party. they are espousing all the ideas the people hate. they want the president to put some popular ideas out there e has no incentive to do so. we are going to come back. there us a character here of the anti-tax campaign. no official leadership rule but a brutal character. yes, grover norquist. is his clout finally starting to sleep with the fishes? that's next. [ male announcer ] in blind taste tests, even ragu users chose prego. prego?! but i've bought ragu for years. [ thinking ] wonder what ot
in washington. the filibuster. the mangled manipulated, miss appropriated filibuster. there is a filibuster that most of us love. that would be the jimmy stewart, mr. smith goes to washington kind. the way it used to be. or at least the way it used to be romanticized. one lone political hero standing on the senate floor fighting for what he knows is right using the senate rule saying that one senator one speaking can speak for as long as he or she wants so long as he or she continues speaking and standing. it could prevent a vote and single handedly save the day for the cause he held so dear. a much less romantic version of that rare event when the late senator strom thurman set the record going 24 hours, 18 minutes all to try to derail the civil right acts of 1957. here he is romanticizing about how he set the record. >> how did you last 24 hours? you never left the senate floor. >> i don't answer the -- beforehand and dried out my body. >> in the sauna? >> yes. so i wouldn't be tempted to go to the bathroom. so i was able to do that. >> oh, dehydration, no big deal when you're trying to s
Search Results 0 to 9 of about 10